Tuesday, May 24, 2022

Vilcek Foundation Partners With Native American-Focused Organizations on 'Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery'



 




Partners With Native American-Focused Organizations on 'Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery'

The Vilcek Foundation worked with the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe to develop the exhibition with the Pueblo Pottery Collective, an organization made up of more than 60 artists, historians, and community curators representing 22 Native American Pueblos



The Vilcek Foundation has partnered with the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to develop a new exhibition, Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery. The exhibition opens July 31, 2022, at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture situated on the traditional lands of the Tewa people, O'gah'poh geh Owingeh (White Shell Water Place), or Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery was curated by the Pueblo Pottery Collective, a group of more than 60 Native American community members convened from the 22 Pueblo communities in the Southwest. The Collective was established in 2019 specifically to develop an exhibition that centers the voices of Native American people in the curation and display of Native American art. The collective is a diverse group that includes potters, designers, writers, poets, community leaders, and museum professionals amongst themselves. A small number of non-Pueblo museum professionals worked as facilitators and writers for this project and are also part of the collective. 

"Grounded in Clay emphasizes the underlying, multifaceted, and nuanced understandings that the Pueblo Indian people of the American Southwest have of one of the more ubiquitous and resilient forms of our material culture—pottery," writes curator Joseph Aguilar. "Historical memories and our understanding of pottery and other cultural patrimonies are tantamount to a form of Indigenous intellect—a physical, spiritual, and intellectual worldview that is inextricably linked to land, people, and history."

Vilcek Foundation President Rick Kinsel worked with Curator Emily Schuchardt Navratil and Seamus McKillop on the coordination of the exhibition in partnership with Elysia Poon, Indian Arts Research Center Director at SAR, and with the community curators from the Pueblo Pottery Collective.

Kinsel has steered the development of the foundation's collection of Native American pottery since 2000; he describes the development of Grounded in Clay as a transformative experience. "Our foundation is based in New York, on the unceded land of the Lenape people, and we acknowledge the sovereignty of Native American peoples is a present and ongoing concern," he says. "By engaging curators from Native American communities in the development of this exhibition, we hope to provide a model for other cultural institutions in supporting the autonomy and independence of Native American nations." 

"Grounded in Clay is not just a project that was developed over three years of dedicated work," says Poon. "It is the result of years—and, in some cases, decades—of relationships and built trust between staff, community curators, and each other. My hope is that we've done justice to the brilliant minds and experiences that were so generously shared throughout this project."

Following the exhibition at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery will travel through 2025, starting with a joint presentation in New York City by the Vilcek Foundation and the Metropolitan Museum of Art from July 13, 2023-June 4, 2024. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalog, Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery, available from Merrell Publishers. 

Learn more about the exhibition: Grounded in Clay: The Spirit of Pueblo Pottery

The Vilcek Foundation

The Vilcek Foundation raises awareness of immigrant contributions in the United States and fosters appreciation for the arts and sciences. The foundation was established in 2000 by Jan and Marica Vilcek, immigrants from the former Czechoslovakia. The mission of the foundation was inspired by the couple's respective careers in biomedical science and art history. Since 2000, the foundation has awarded over $6.4 million in prizes to foreign-born individuals and has supported organizations with over $5.6 million in grants.

The Vilcek Foundation is a private operating foundation, a federally tax-exempt nonprofit organization under IRS Section 501(c)(3). To learn more, please visit vilcek.org

#groundedinclay#fineartmagazine#vilcekartfun


Lyndhurst Presents Women’s Work On View May 26 through September 26, 2022

 

Lyndhurst Presents Women’s Work
On View May 26 through September 26, 2022  

 
This groundbreaking exhibition tracks the deep, pervasive, and continuing influence of the historic female domestic craft tradition in the practice of contemporary women artists and invites new investigations into the position of women in the contemporary art world
Top: Diningroom installation. Bottom Left: Gallery installation. Bottom Right: Bedroom Installation
Tarrytown NY: A groundbreaking new exhibition of historic and contemporary works by women artists fills the Lyndhurst Mansion and gallery this summer. Women’s Work includes more than 125 works of art in a variety of media by American women from diverse backgrounds utilizing artistic traditions that date back centuries.

Tracking the continuing influence of the 18th and 19th century domestic handcraft tradition in the practice of contemporary women artists, the exhibition explores how this embrace of feminine domesticity as an expression of gender-specific artistic identity has prevailed as a practice for women artists from the 1970s and 1980s to the present.

The exhibition was conceived by Lyndhurst director Howard Zar, and is co-curated by Nancy Carlisle, Senior Curator of Collections at Historic New England with consulting curator Rebecca R. Hart, the former Polly and Mark Addison curator of modern and contemporary art at the Denver Art Museum.

“In Women’s Work we are placing artworks from different centuries in conversation side by side in the domestic setting for which the historic works were originally designed,” says Zar. “By showing influences across time, whether specific or subtle, the exhibition offers viewers an opportunity to interrogate their own attitudes about art by women and invites them to contemplate the distinctions art critics have drawn between “craft” and “fine art”based on materials, gender or practice, that have served to diminish the work of women artists.”
Top left: Faith Ringgold, Brenda, 1976. Top Right: Unknown African American Maker, early 20th Century. Bottom Left Kiki Smith, Little Red Riding hood doll, 2002. Bottom Right Julia Beecher, Missionary Rag Baby, 1893-1910
Women’s Work is presented jointly with Historic New England, which has provided artworks from the 18th and 19th centuries to be exhibited alongside contemporary works. 

“Historic New England is delighted to be a part of this exhibition,” said Nancy Carlisle. “The juxtaposition of the historic contributions of women with contemporary women artists helps showcase the role women have had in the arts for centuries.”
 
A fully-illustrated catalog with essays by leading scholars and art historians, along with a symposium, on-line lectures and special guided tours accompany the exhibition. CATALOG PDF now available by request.
Left: Diego D'Estrada, Cameo Set, 1855-65, Right: Catherine Opie Self Portrait Nursing, 2019
BACKGROUND
Prior to the 21st century, women were taught and expected to master a broad variety of arts, home decoration, sewing and craft, collectively known as, “women’s work,” at a time when women were not allowed to hold professions outside the home. These crafts could be practiced as both hobby and home-based money-making venture. Women passed down this handiwork tradition over generations but because this artistic tradition was practiced in the home by women, it was generally viewed as inferior to the artistic traditions of painting and sculpture practiced by men, as their career.
 
As women started to emerge and be recognized as contemporary artists during the 1960s and1970s  (as opposed to the generation of the 1940s and 1950s who often had to subjugate their careers to those of their artist husbands) this new generation of women artists often found themselves engaged in deep explorations of gender identity. They often rejected the formal training that they received from male artists and made the radical choice to incorporate artistic traditions and techniques known to their grandmothers. This use of so-called handcraft traditions by contemporary women artists also inadvertently led to female artists being seen by critics as inferior and less worthy of exhibition and their work less highly valued by curators and collectors.
 
 
Left: Belle D. Grace and Murty Marie Grace, 1883-89. Right: Faith Ringgold, Feminist Series: Of My Two Handicaps #10, 1972
As trailblazing artist Harmony Hammond states in her artist’s statement about the late 1960s and 1970s, “Paintings were shaped, unstretched, draped, woven, flocked, stitched, bejeweled, and grommeted. Slowly, painting was subjected to the force of gravity, taken out of the rectangle and off the wall, relaxed, collapsed, and reconfigured. Feminism brought a gendered content to this way of working.”
 
The influence of historic traditions on contemporary artists becomes more apparent through the design of the exhibition, which places historic precedents next to contemporary works, often through the rooms of Lyndhurst mansion for which the historic works were originally intended.

For example, a 19th century dome-covered flower display will be juxtaposed with a dome-covered glass flower display created by Kiki Smith, both placed on a center table in the Lyndhurst parlor, the type of room for which such lavish decorations were originally conceived in the 18th and 19th centuries.
Left: Cindy Sherman, Soup Tureen, 1990  Right : Cecilia Thaxter Cup and Saucer, 19th century
Lyndhurst’s dining room has been set with examples of 19th century painted plates by Emily Cole, daughter of Hudson River painter Thomas Cole and by poet and artist Celia Thaxter displayed next to similar works by Judy Chicago and Cindy Sherman.  Antique quilts are shown with quilts by Faith Ringgold, Dindga McCannon and Jane Kaufman. Vintage Lingerie embroidered with rap lyrics by Zoe Buckman and a nightgown embroidered by Maira Kalman are displayed with similar embroidered vintage pieces that belonged to Lyndhurst’s female owners and are displayed on the Louis Vuitton “personals” trunk belonging to Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand, Lyndhurst’s last owner.
 
The adoption of these techniques spans a surprisingly broad array. Works by Kara Walker using the medium of cut black paper silhouettes and Elaine Reichek’s use of early American samplers are visually indistinguishable from historic precedents but with a completely different interpretive intent. Liza Lou’s adoption of beadwork to create modern domestic objects and explore domesticity utilizes a medium historically practiced by both Native American and European-descended women but appear visually distinct from the historic precedents.  Jenny Holzer’s use of verbal platitudes as art is part of a long tradition but modernizes the medium from samplers, needlepointed pillows and watercolor fracturs to electronic LEDs.  
 
The exhibition is broadly representative, including 20th-century pioneers and artists who have become household names, mid- and late-career artists who have toiled for years with varied levels of public recognition, as well as younger artists. While the exhibition focuses almost exclusively on American artists, the participants include diverse races and religions.  
 
The exhibition opens to the public on May 26, 2022 and continues through September 26, 2022. Lyndhurst is located along the Hudson River in Tarrytown New York. Lyndhurst’s grounds are open daily from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. All visitors must adhere to current CDC and NY State Covid-19 guidelines in place at the time of visit. for more information and directions see www.lyndhurst.org
About Lyndhurst 
Originally built in 1838, Lyndhurst is considered by many to be the most important American home of the 19th century. Designed by A.J. Davis, the Frank Lloyd Wright of the 19th century in Gothic Revival style, Lyndhurst was one of the first homes to be built in the Hudson Valley as a romantic retreat. Lyndhurst is situated on 67 magnificently landscaped acres on the widest part of the lower Hudson River. Lyndhurst is where the Hudson Valley begins. For more information visit www.lyndhurst.org. 

***UPDATES: The New York Times features Women's Work in the May 1, 2022 MUSEUMS section.  

THE EXHIBITION IS FULLY-INSTALLED. PDF of CATALOG AVAILABLE BY REQUEST.  FOR A PREVIEW PLEASE REACH OUT TO SCHEDULE A TIME TO VISIT.  janrothschild@gmail.com or call 917-891-1126

Lyndhurst is the site for the filming of the new HBO hit series Gilded Age. A main character in the series is based on Jay Gould, owner of Lyndhurst. Read a behind the scenes story of the filming HERE.

About Historic New England
Previously known as the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA), Historic New England is the oldest and largest regional preservation organization in the United States.  Historic New England collects and preserves buildings, landscapes, and objects dating from the seventeenth century to the present and uses them to keep history alive and to help people develop a deeper understanding and enjoyment of New England life and appreciation for its preservation.
 
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Copyright © 2022, Lyndhurst/National Trust for Historic Preservation All rights reserved.

Monday, May 23, 2022

One Twentyeight June 1-14, 2022 RESILIENCE (Then & Now) Curated by Bethany Jacobson

RESILIENCE (Then & Now)
Curated by Bethany Jacobson


Opening Reception: June 1, 2022, 6-9 pm, 
June 1-14, 2022, Tuesday - Sunday, noon-7 pm

Artists:

Samira Abassy, Sylvain Durand, Stefanie Dworkin, Orestes Gonzalez, Anthony-Haden Guest, David Higginbotham, Bethany Jacobson, Gabriel Koren, Maxi Matuschka, Sante Scardillo, Bobby Watlington, Ricardo Woo.

RESILIENCE:
The process of adapting well in the face of adversity.
This group exhibition includes twelve diverse artists, working in photography, painting, collage, cartoons, and sculpture, who have kept their artistic practice alive in New York City over multiple decades and understand the meaning of resilience. 
Here, age is a badge of honor, a sign of maturity evident in the transformative power of each artist’s achievement.
#onetwentyeight#fineartmagazine#resilienceartfun

Madelyn Jordon Fine Art Facebook ‌ Twitter ‌ Instagram ‌ ARTIST SPOTLIGHT DAVID KIMBALL ANDERSON Minimal | Maximal, on view now, features new still life sculptures by California artist, David Kimball Anderson. In presenting the exhibition, we queried the artist, how do these elegant works fit into your fifty-three-year career as an artist? How did you become the artist you are today?  What followed is Anderson's fascinating telling of his personal story and studio practice, including introspective thoughts about events, pivotal moments and people from his past. From his artistic beginnings in Los Angeles, spurred by a high school art teacher, who "opened a door" for the teenager to walk through and never look back, Anderson moved in California's artistic circles of the day, interacting with John Altoon, Richard Diebenkorn, Bruce Conner, James Reineking, Peter Voulkos and many others. The still life sculptures of our current exhibition began in 2006, inspired by a passion for the work of painter, Morris Graves. Presently, Anderson continues to construct his own still life pieces, making molds from his collection of various vessels and cutting steel flowers inspired by those growing in his garden. Read Anderson's story here. Minimal | Maximal is on view through June 11. See the show online. DAVID KIMBALL ANDERSON, Seeds, 2022, bronze steel and paint, 24 x 8 x 6 in. David Kimball Anderson has exhibited his work in museums and galleries nationally for the past 40 years. A former assistant to Peter Voulkos, and Whitney Biennial participant, he received a Pollack-Krasner Foundation Grant, three NEA Arts Fellowships, and a California State University Research Grant. His work is in numerous public and private collections including Albright- Knox Gallery, Buffalo, NY, National Endowment for the Arts, the World Bank, Art in Embassies, Washington, DC, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA, Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA, San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, TX; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM, Albuquerque Museum and the City of Albuquerque, NM. From 1967-1971, he attended the San Francisco Art Institute. For inquiries, please contact info@madelynjordonfineart.com Madelyn Jordon Fine Art 37 Popham Road Scarsdale, NY 10583 T: (914) 723-8738 E: info@madelynjordonfineart.com W: MadelynJordonFineArt.com Hours: Tues-Sat. | 10:00 - 5:30 #MadelynJordonFineArt Follow Us: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter Visit Us at:

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT
DAVID KIMBALL ANDERSON

Minimal | Maximal, on view nowfeatures new still life sculptures by California artist, David Kimball Anderson. In presenting the exhibition, we queried the artist, how do these elegant works fit into your fifty-three-year career as an artist? How did you become the artist you are today? 

What followed is Anderson's fascinating telling of his personal story and studio practice, including introspective thoughts about events, pivotal moments and people from his past.  
 
From his artistic beginnings in Los Angeles, spurred by a high school art teacher, who "opened a door" for the teenager to walk through and never look back, Anderson moved in California's artistic circles of the day, interacting with John Altoon, Richard Diebenkorn, Bruce Conner, James Reineking, Peter Voulkos and many others.  
 
The still life sculptures of our current exhibition began in 2006, inspired by a passion for the work of painter, Morris Graves. Presently, Anderson continues to construct his own still life pieces, making molds from his collection of various vessels and cutting steel flowers inspired by those growing in his garden.
 
Read Anderson's story here.
 
Minimal | Maximal is on view through June 11. See the show online

DAVID KIMBALL ANDERSON, Seeds, 2022, bronze steel and paint, 24 x 8 x 6 in.
David Kimball Anderson has exhibited his work in museums and galleries nationally for the past 40 years. A former assistant to Peter Voulkos, and Whitney Biennial participant, he received a Pollack-Krasner Foundation Grant, three NEA Arts Fellowships, and a California State University Research Grant. His work is in numerous public and private collections including Albright- Knox Gallery, Buffalo, NY, National Endowment for the Arts, the World Bank, Art in Embassies, Washington, DC, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA, Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA, San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, TX; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM, Albuquerque Museum and the City of Albuquerque, NM. From 1967-1971, he attended the San Francisco Art Institute.
For inquiries, please contact info@madelynjordonfineart.com


#madelynjordonfineart#fimeartmagazine#fineartmagazinesummerfun

NYWIFT Talks are free for all to attend., Tribeca Film Festival, highlighting filmmakers including our very own NYWIFT Members at this year’s festival.


nywift.org

Welcome to NYWIFT Talks, a weekly series to bring updated news and vital information about the impact of COVID-19 and current events on the media and entertainment industry. Industry professionals will be in conversation discussing what you need to know about theatrical releases, digital advances, virtual tools, festival opportunities, production updates and more. 

NYWIFT Talks are free for all to attend.

On this week’s NYWIFT Talks, we’re headed to the 2022 Tribeca Film Festival, highlighting filmmakers including our very own NYWIFT Members at this year’s festival. 

This week, we are covering some short films in this year’s film festival including Valentine, and more. In conversation with Directors Chris McNabb and Beck Kitsis, A.K. Sandhu, and more to be announced. Moderated by NYWIFT Program Manager Barbara G Vasconez.

Date: Friday, May 27th, 2022
Time: 4:00 pm ET
Cost: Free

Register

Panelists

Chris McNabb (they/them) is a Brooklyn-based filmmaker, two-time Emmy Award-winning editor, and Sundance Documentary Edit & Story Lab Fellow. They edited the documentary Whose Streets? (Magnolia Pictures), which opened the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, and was later nominated for two Gotham Awards, a Critics’ Choice Award, and a Peabody Award. Their latest documentary Look At Me: XXXTENTACION (Hulu) premiered at SXSW in 2022. Chris’ past nonfiction work also includes the documentary Narrowsburg, the interactive documentary, and the accompanying short film Marcela &Rock. In addition, Chris edited two short fiction films,The Rat and The Three Men You Met at Night. They are also editing Walk by Me, a follow-up to the 1990 Sundance Filmmaker Trophy Award-winning documentary Metamorphosis. In addition, together with Beck Kitsis, Chris is developing an episodic series called House of Thorns. The short film Valentine, their directorial debut, will screen at the Tribeca Festival in 2022.

Beck Kitsis (she/her) is a filmmaker and musician based in New York City. In 2019, she was selected for Film at Lincoln Center’s Artist Academy at the 57th New York Film Festival, the Sundance Screenwriting Intensive, and the Women at Sundance Financing Intensive. Beck’s first short film The Three Men You Met at Night. Her second short Red is the Color of Beauty (2021). Her latest short Valentine will screen at the Tribeca Festival in 2022. Beck produced the documentary Narrowsburg (Camden International Film Festival, DOC NYC 2019), the short horror film The Rat(Sundance 2019), and the experimental short The Inconceivable Mountain (NoBudge – Best Films of 2019). Currently, Beck is co-writing/producing the Sundance and Cinereach supported horror film Strawberry Summer and writing/directing the queer home invasion film Deer in the Wood. In addition, together with Chris McNabb, Beck is developing an episodic series called House of Thorns.

A.K. is a Director, Producer, Cinematographer, and internationally published Photographer. She is the founder of Re–Present Partners, a womxn- and BIPOC-owned, Oakland-based production company that embraces the expansion of how underrepresented communities are depicted in media. A.K. employs documentary filmmaking and photography to revive absent narratives that have been buried or suppressed. Her work crosses into experimental docu-hybrid modes of storytelling, probing themes such as race, gender, spirituality, and cross-cultural solidarity. She was awarded the 2021 Emerging Artist Award in the State of California. A.K. is a DocNYC/VC Storytelling Incubator fellow and was part of the inaugural cohort for Represent Media’s Re-Take Oakland fellowship (2019–2021) for emerging BIPOC filmmakers. A.K. directed, produced, and filmed her short documentary, For Love And Legacy, about the making of the first monument to honor the Black Panther Party. The film premiered on the 2022 film festival circuit during Womxn’s History Month. She is also the Co-Director, Producer, and Co-DOP of her first feature documentary, Sign My Name To Freedom, and in development for her first episodic documentary. Inspired by her father’s photographs of their family, she exited a career in finance to pursue her love for visual storytelling. A.K. has earned degrees from Columbia University and U.C. Berkeley, and is a member of A-Doc, Brown Girls Doc Mafia, CineFemme, and Collective of Documentary Womxn Cinematographers. She speaks Punjabi, Hindi/Urdu, and English.

Barbara Vásconez (moderator) is the Program Manager at New York Women in Film & Television. Before joining NYWIFT, she held the position of General Manager at the Quad Cinema for three years. She has worked for a variety of film festivals, including the Tribeca Film Festival, Rooftop Films, Hamptons Film Festival, Montclair Film Festival, Mill Valley Film Festival, DOC NYC, and the Nantucket Film Festival. Her spare time is spent programming panels and creating unique community engagement opportunities for the New York Latino Film Festival. In 2019, she launched and founded the Ville Film Festival in Somerville, New Jersey. In 2020, she joined the Ecuadorian Film Festival as Co-Director. Her educational goals include working to develop film programs in New Jersey that improve film education for low income students. She works on amplifying the Latinx community and speaking on important issues like immigration and minimum wage. She is committed to the importance of film as a means of community engagement. Barbara has a degree in Film and Video Production from the School of Visual arts in NYC and holds a Business certificate from W.O.R.C in Philadelphia. 

Event Information
NYWIFT Talks at 2022 Tribeca Film Festival: Highlighting Tribeca Shorts Program (Part 1)
Date/Time: Friday, May 27, 2022
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM 
Location: Virtual Free Program 
 Register »
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